Tag Archives: reusing redwood

noe valley victorian bridge

roof framing

Once the 2×4 flimsy roof was ripped off, the new roof was framed back up pretty quickly. The top floor will have new rooms so we needed to take advantage of dormer space, and as much height as possible.  The view above is looking toward the street. old shingles

On the right is a close-up of the layers of shingles, starting with the original cedar shakes from late 1800s and a series of asphalt shingles right on top.  Note there is no waterproofing in the old roofing system! On the left is an old coffee coffee can that was found during demolition.

dormer framing

Here is a view looking toward the back of the house; the roof is a tricky series of angles and shapes. At the very back is the square ‘box’ addition from sometime in the ’80s or ’90s.

remodel

A view from the inside of the new bedroom at the former attic level. It’s a double-ridge dormer. The neighbor’s house is just outside – tight urban living! new dormerFrom the street you barely notice the dormers. There’s my Volvo out front 🙂 dormerThe same view a few weeks later after the plywood sheathing has been installed on walls and roof. triangle windowAnother few weeks and the windows are installed – this is the corner facing the street and Twin Peaks beyond, so we thought it important to have a window along the slope where the dormer meets the roof. Uncommon, but I was able to dig some examples up online. footbridgeThe ‘great room’ will occupy the area at the back of the house on the middle level. There I am crouched on the old attic 2×4 framing, which we repurposed as a bridge walkway to connect the areas of the new top floor.  The photo below was taken sometime between the two photos above, once the attic floor was taken out but before the bridge steel was installed. steel framingI am SO excited to have this steel exposed in the house; it will be a nice mix of Victorian and modern together, and tell a story of the old framing that was reused to build it.  bridge walkwayA view below the bridge toward the rear wall.  bridge sketchA sketch when we were figuring out how the bridge would meet the floor on each side, which were at different heights! lincrustaAbove is a detail of the existing lincrusta wall covering featuring birds (Swallows?) original to the house. Most of it was removed but will be replaced.  Next to that is the rectangle of a closed window found behind the refrigerator. Much of the work at the upper two levels happened while the new concrete footing was being poured around the perimeter of the house at the ground level. Groundwater was discovered during excavation which set the progress at the ground floor back a few weeks.

More to come!

Leave a comment

Filed under noe valley victorian

San Francisco bungalow progress

Here’s the look of demo….the mess, the uncovered pieces, the view to new possibilities.  

This is in the kitchen – behind the cabinetry and appliances we uncovered evidence of a once-PINK kitchen!  Awesome. I thought this was a nice composition…A heap of ceiling coming down.  The issue with these older homes is that the walls have no insulation.  I’ve never done blown-in insulation, where a hole is drilled into each study bay and it’s filled with some kind of loose fiber.   View of the hobbit staircase.  Cute, but even I at 5′-9″ would almost crack my head on the way up. The old brick coal-burning fireplace.  You probably couldn’t fit more than a Duraflame log in here, on the days you can actually burn a fire in San Francisco.Here’s a painted wall we found within a dropped ceiling.  This may have once been an exterior porch.  Over the years, I’ve seen this green-blue color very often in porches, laundry rooms, ‘utility’ rooms, etc.  I like it, and am interested in knowing why this was common practice for paint color in those spaces..? Looks like someone built a house within this house at one point in time!  There’s that green-blue color again. Cobwebs, or “Irish lace” as I was told – in the uncovered attic space. Spoooky..Down at the first floor here’s the shadow of an old staircase found within a wall. It was an exterior staircase since that’s redwood sidingTwo views of eave closet spaces, matched in reverse.  Lots of old wood in this house – can we reuse some, please, someday!?  Clients are often dubious or nervous about the prospect of this beat-up redwood being turned into beautiful interior wall cladding.  I know it’s possible, it’s been done – even with lath.  It does add more time/labor but in the end, it tells a story, is warm and tangible, and relates directly to the history of the house.

1 Comment

Filed under bungalow remodel