Tag Archives: to the studs remodel

san francisco magazine

a huge thanks to our photographer Melissa Kaseman for pitching our project to San Francisco magazine. They picked up the story and it’s in the November issue.

flip through their entire online issue¬†here, or check it out in images below. Or better yet buy a hard copy, cut those pages out and put them on your wall for inspiration ūüôā and call us when you’re ready to do your own to the studs remodel!

this project was a fun collaboration with really great clients. we can’t thank them enough for being open to 99% of our design ideas. they wanted a sense of whimsy in the house and I think we achieved that feeling.

we like to think of this house as a bright, inviting, energetic series of spaces with bold patterns and textures. it has plentiful windows to grab distant views out the front and a 17ft wide multi-panel sliding door to connect to a cozy garden in the back.

take a look ———–>

san-francisco-magazine-glen-park-remodel_page_1san-francisco-magazine-glen-park-remodel_page_2

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the cabin

cabinat long last we have a place of our own for a to-the-studs project! we could not be more thrilled. this woodsy little confection was built in 1963, at the tail-end of the mid-century era, in the California Sierra foothills. after a 3-month search through the pine forest with our realtor, we settled on the one: it was the right size (800 sq ft) not oversized like some ski-houses tend to be; in a good location we’ve visited with friends – it has access to a lake; and most importantly because it hadn’t really been touched much since the 60s and needs work – nothing major, but work that we’re anxious to do. a real vintage fixer-upper. below are photos of the other sides.¬†rear-facadegable-roofa-frameit was affectionately referred to as ‘cigarette house’ by our realtor because it was beyond saturated with the smell. but that only ‘fueled’ our interest more – we knew we could do a job on it. I like the board-and-batten siding but not the lemon color. so un-woodsy! it’s nestled into a gentle hill with a deck in front and a cute guest cottage / toolshed out back – perfect for our unwanted guests lol!¬†guest-cottageI assume it was used for sleeping because it’s insulated, carpeted and has lighting. Inside the house, it’s wood-on-wood-on-wood. another big selling point was the vaulted, knotty pine ceiling….which we love and think really makes the cabin.¬†knotty-pine-ceilingthere are three truss-beams running through the living area. my engineer colleague took one look and said they’re not structural. but we’re keeping them, of course.vaulted-kitchenthe kitchen is quaint, and came with no refrigerator. that’s OK – we have coolers, for now. seems like a mircrowave was taken too – but we don’t care – less things to throw out because it would probably not been one we liked the look of. the cabinets are not original, maybe one of the only things updated in the house, but they’re OK for now. we have plans. dropped-ceilingin the bedrooms, the vaulted ceiling disappears….WTF. why are these ceilings flat / dropped? the first time I saw this, I was certain that the vaulted pine must continue above, and this is only a cosmetic lower ceiling.¬†we also did not love the built-in closets that took up floor space in the cozy bedrooms.¬†accordian-doorhow about those faux-wood accordion doors? oh my vintage! there’s no way they’d make the cut.¬†camp-bathroomThe Bathroom…pretty basic…you can’t tell but the toilet is on an angle – we’ll call it the V8 toilet.¬†I’m glad¬†there’s¬†a wall-hung sink, I often prefer them over vanity cabinets that can make a small space feel cluttered (like that shelf!). wood-toilet-seateven the toilet seat was wood-grain. the entire bathroom was paneled, ceiling and all. I actually like this curved-corner medicine cabinet and think with a little spray-paint it can stay. that outlet is not¬†GFI = good thing I don’t use a blowdryer ūüôā¬†vintage-light-fixturessome fun light fixtures. old-west scalloped realness above, and the lower one is the same as was¬†in my childhood bedroom – and I’m sure many bedrooms across the USA..¬†eames-shell-chairthe original wood wall paneling: to keep or not to keep?? it’s ‘real’ wood, as in very thin sheets of plywood. not plastic printed woodgrain that came along later. this is genuine wood..and wood makes the CABIN. we are at once charmed by it, and yet could also see painting it white to brighten the place up. for now we’ll keep it, other things to do first. we’re also unsure if all exterior walls are insulated. the ‘Woodsman’ fireplace is so damn awesome. we’ve already built many fires in it.¬†woodsman-fireplacewe like to think we are becoming woodsmen…ha.¬†6a00d83451ccbc69e201156f66c1c7970c-400wivintage moment:¬†maybe we should keep the paneling in the bathroom? she doesn’t seem to mind it.cabin-interiorand as for this short, but obtrusive wall: I suspect there is a structural post within it, supporting the ridge beam. but it’s in a bad spot. we think this is where a refrigerator once was (on the kitchen side) but we don’t plan to put it back there. this wall irks us but I have a solution.

f2d5d29e207cca0499fe5f0fb85026b1your homework is to think about the paneling! should it stay or should it go?! more to come!

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bay view house

front facadeIs it too late to say happy new year? I say no since this is my first 2016 post. This is a cute¬†1940s house set on a cul-de-sac, 2 bedroom / 2 bath. Not nearly enough room for a family of now 4 who entertain and occasionally work from home. The program is to add a second floor and push the house out in the rear yard to get more space on the first floor. New total will be 4 bed, 4 bath.¬†view of san franciscoOne¬†really cool thing about its location on¬†a south-facing hill is a surprisingly direct¬†view back to the city across the bay.¬†old stuccoOtherwise it is standard suburban rancho from another era…ready for an update!exposed beamsAt some point the living room was expanded and the ceiling was vaulted with exposed beams – a really nice look that we’re maintaining and improving upon in the new design.¬†kitchen skylightThe kitchen is workable, but feels a little cramped. ¬†A low-ceiling¬†breakfast nook is hidden away in the distance.

In the early stages we studied the possible massing for the top floor addition.¬†21 BAYVIEW TERR_Front1_14-0401We initially settled on the gable roof with an overhang at the front. BUT: heed my advice, and get a professional lot survey! It was discovered that the house sat within the front yard setback so we had to redesign and push the second floor back. 21 BAYVIEW TERR 2015 balconySilver lining is that they will have a walk-out balcony at the front (the windows have become doors now..) and a circular window to the side gains a city view as well.¬†storypolesStorypoles were installed to demonstrate the extent of the new addition.¬†construction demoDemo happens quickly…¬†The back wall of the house was removed to accommodate the expansion. It almost looks like a stage / bandshell.¬†garden excavationThe rear deck was removed to make way for the addition and pushing the land back a little for a new deck. All this while preserving the persimmon tree in the upper left of the photo!stud framingHere is a photo after concrete and during initial framing from last Fall. The ground floor is mostly framed, and the second floor is just starting. Steel beams are seen on the left, awaiting install, and a narrow Simpson Strong Wall on the left of the house.¬†We’re already far ahead of this phase – stay tuned for more!

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pacific heights part deux

birds eye view

It’s always a treat to return to a house and start the second phase of a project you designed a master plan for. In this case I worked on an interior to-the-studs remodel of this house back in 2009 – see it here¬†in our portfolio and here on the blog as it was ripped apart. This was¬†a fun collaboration with Ian Stallings Design.¬†Above you see an aerial view of the house as it was recently, with a low pitched roof and attic above the main living space. I was thrilled when the new owners contacted me and expressed that they now want to add the top floor.proposed rendering

We worked off the old plans and made some modifications for the new owners. See renderings of the proposed top floor addition – an elegant, flat roof structure with 2 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, office space and large outdoor decks that will tie right in with the existing house. The front deck is largest since here in SF you’re encouraged to set back top additions so they’re not competing with the original facade… like it or not! ¬†Below is a view of the rear of the house, with the new intimate master bedroom deck overlooking the existing courtyard space below.

rendering

roof removal

We’re working with Cook Construction for this project – a team we’re very happy with. The demolition of the old roof, its 5 layers of asphalt shingles plus original wood shingles, went pretty swiftly. Above, looking toward the front of the house, below, the rear.¬†old attic

redwood framing

A view from within the front part of the attic looking back – you can see all the recessed lighting, wiring, and ducting from the 2009 project.

top floor addition

Just a short time later, the new floor level was framed in. pacific heights

At the very front of the house, you see the old boards of the cornice / parapet. The views open up in this direction.

framing

Above left – the opening for the new staircase. On the right, the only part of the new roof that is sloped is over the master closet, a result of negotiating with neighbors who were concerned by potential¬†impacts to light. They’ve since moved away.¬†front facade

A little over a week later, the top floor has been mostly framed and plywood is up. This is the front wall. master bedroom

Above is the wall of doors and windows from the master bedroom. new view

Lastly, the beautiful¬†view from the office / hallway area, between two adjacent buildings to the hills beyond. Stay tuned – this one’s moving fast!

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